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Thursday 2 October  
Ryan Knighton

The State We're In - Keeping Up Appearances

On air: 15 September 2012 2:00 (Photo: Ryan Knighton)

More about:

The State We're In, 15 September 2012. A Canadian writer on the frustrations and humour of going blind. A Brazilian plastic surgeon on what she will, and won’t, do to help her patients. An Indian inventor who nearly lost his marriage when he tried to create affordable sanitary napkins. And an Australian doctor-in-training whose bedside manner is a constant challenge: he has Asperger syndrome.

Comment on this show or listen to previous shows.

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Ryan Knighton
Ryan Knighton
Cockeyed - listen in new player

Canadian writer Ryan Knighton recounts what it’s like to slowly go blind and how he awkwardly – and sometimes hilariously - learned to accept the reality of the white cane. 

Ryan tells host Jonathan Groubert how he took his infant daughter for a hair-raising walk around the block, despite not being able to see where he was going.

And given the choice of getting bionic eyes, he’d prefer it if he could take them out once in a while. 

 


Dr. Beatriz Brito
Dr. Beatriz Brito
Beautiful by Brito - listen in new player
 
Dr. Beatriz Brito is a plastic surgeon with her own clinic in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
 
She tells Jonathan what she will do – and won’t do – to help her patients become a better version of themselves.

 

 

 

 


Kenzo Low
Kenzo Low
Essay: Asperger doctor - listen in new player
 
Kenzo Low in Melbourne, Australia meets patients regularly at a clinic as part of his medical training.
 
The interactions are sometimes tough going for Kenzo: he has Asperger syndrome, and can’t read social cues the way others can.
 
Socially, he likens himself to bittersweet chocolate: an acquired taste.
 

 

 

More: Tony Attwood - Australian world-reknown expert on Asperger syndrome
 
Introduction to Asperger syndrome - presentations for children using simple language.

 
Asperger syndrome and adults - Better Health Channel
 
Survival guide for AS adults - written by Mark Segar (a British AS adult, now deceased).
 
Strategy guide for AS adults in the workplace (especially in "white-collar" positions), written by an AS individual.

Arunchalam Muruganantham
Arunchalam Muruganantham
They thought I was psycho - listen in new player
 
Arunchalam Muruganantham is an Indian inventor who wondered why his wife was using dirty rags during her period.
 
Then he discovered 90 percent of women in India did the same because sanitary pads are too expensive.
 
So he became obsessed with creating a cheap, safe alternative - even if it cost him his marriage, his friendships, and his money.
 
More: Social entrepreneur with a passion for periods.

Discussion

Kenzo 8 October 2012 - 10:33am

Hi, thank you for uploading my segment. I haven't listened to it but will so when I have spare time. Apologies for the interview at the time, coz I was still somewhat incoherent/non-fluent + nervous, so thank you for editing out the "Ummm"s and "uhhh"s :)

I have to point out a mistake though, I'm not a doctor, I'm a medical student (haven't graduated yet)! Can you correct that bit on this page please?

Also the link for "Asperger Management" isn't working, its correct link is

www.aspergermanagement.com

Thank you,

Kenzo

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Kevin Garry 15 September 2012 - 11:52pm / D.C., US

I'm glad Joanna M. Has no trouble with either foreign accents or the added problem of imperfect radio reception, but I had no problem with the use of a voice-over & found the story riveting. He's my newest hero!

Joanna Margueritte 16 September 2012 - 3:24pm

"foreign" to whom? English is the most widely spoken language in India for obvious reasons and I bet this inventor speaks it better than me or you. Would you also call a Scottish accent "foreign"? I didn't think so.

Joanna Margueritte 15 September 2012 - 11:04pm / United States

I am outraged by your production of the interview with the Indian inventor. Having a man talk over his voice as if the interviewee was not understandable (when in fact he was speaking perfect English) felt like a seriously inappropriate post-colonial condescending thing to do. Please refrain from this in the future. The man was perfectly understandable by himself.

Thank you.

user avatar
Greg Kelly 16 September 2012 - 9:11am

Hi Joanna, I'm sorry you were outraged at what you take to be a post-colonial condescension on our part towards one of our interviewees. The fact, however, is that much of the recording of his voice was incomprehensible: it was recorded with industrial pounding nearby and indeed at times his English was not clear enough. The parts you found comprehensible were those we chose to amplify so listeners could get some sense of his personality and emotional presence. You may find it worth knowing that the interviewee had no problem with our interview. 

Joanna Margueritte 16 September 2012 - 3:03pm / United States

Thanks for your response. It just sounded really awkward, when he would start answering a question and then suddenly was faded out in favor of another voice, as if there was a need for "translation". I don't think your intent was wrong- I am just telling you what impression it gives this listener. And that is really unfortunate.

Anonymous 15 September 2012 - 10:26pm / usa

omg - listening to npr interview with guy who has retinitis pigmentosa talking about going blind and it feels like i am Roberta Flack; multiple car wrecks; blunt ophthalmologists diagnosis (and coming home to tell parents when grandparents are at table); flirting accidentally with inanimate objects at bars and finally picking up a cane after one too many spills crossing traffic Author Ryan Knighton; you're killing me - but softly :D

Anonymous 15 September 2012 - 10:20pm

This blog is by a young man who is a kindred spirit of Ryan Knighton-- http://laughingatmynightmare.1000notes.com/ Shane finds the sometimes dark and often slapstick humor in disability.

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