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Thursday 27 November  

The State We're In - Being gay in Africa - special

On air: 30 January 2010 0:30 - 4 February 2010 19:45 (Graphic: RNW)

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The State We're In, 30 January 2010: As Uganda considers strengthening its already homophobic laws, this week we present a special edition of the programme looking at what it's like to be gay throughout Africa with voices from Namibia, Ghana, Uganda and South Africa.

Listen to this week's show in full:


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Life for gays?
Africa is not a place to be out and proud right now. Homosexual acts are illegal in 37 countries on the continent and in recent years many African leaders have been increasing the anti-gay rhetoric. In Uganda a proposed law would make being gay punishable by life imprisonment. Jonathan is joined by Ian Swartz, founder of a gay rights organisation in Namibia, and Scott Long from Human Rights Watch in New York.
    

Lorenzo’s story
Lorenzo is a hairdresser in Cameroon. He met a man in a bar and they clicked and they decided to live together. That’s when the police got involved. Lorenzo spent seven months in prison without trial.
 
Ian’s story
Ian Swartz founded the Rainbow Project in Namibia at a time when its president began to hound gays and lesbians. The home affairs minister called for their elimination and became known as the minister for homophobic affairs. Ian talks about the abuse he experienced and why it increased his determination to create change.
 

Prince’s story
Prince Macdonald, in his own words, is gay, proud and African. He lives in the Ghanaian capital Accra and talks about how, despite homosexual acts being illegal in his country, he’s still determined to enjoy life as much as possible. 
 
Steve’s story
Her real name is Mapaseka, but everyone calls her Steve. She was young when she came out to her family. It wasn’t easy, but they eventually accepted her. But when she was 15, She was raped by a family friend who believed she should be shown what it’s like to be a ‘real’ woman. Despite a constitution protecting gay and lesbians, she still feels unsafe.

Link: video interviews with South African victims of 'corrective rape' from The Guardian website.

 

  • Ian Swartz of Namibia&#039;s Rainbow Project<br>&copy; Photo: RNW - http://www.rnw.nl/english

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Discussion

Alexy 7 December 2010 - 5:08pm

Please confirme from where do you know this information, for me everything here need to be confirmed.
Parier chez les meilleurs site de paris en ligne comme betclic site agrée

user avatar
Greg Kelly 8 December 2010 - 10:18am / Netherlands

Hi Alexy: what information exactly are you talking about?  Greg Kelly, Editor TSWI

Alexy 14 November 2010 - 12:41am

Please confirme from where do you know this information, for me everything here need to be confirmed.

Parier chez les meilleurs site de paris en ligne comme betclic site agrée

.

Nikey 30 May 2010 - 1:46am / Namibia

I Think everyone has a right to be what they want in life, if gay or straight it is your choice after all. Who are you to judge them Gods says in HIS word i have given then over to have this desires , and the wolrd is responsible all toghter , becos we all have sin and worship idols that why GOD brought this desires in us.And HIS says dont judge them , HE is the judge. SO leave the people alone they are people with feelings too. They want to be happy and love. That is why i say iam gay and brought and if GOD have to change me let HIM , and not a HUMAN to decide on MY precious life given by GOD as a gift to me.Read the first 2 chapters of ROMANS in the bible than you will understand.

johnPaul 8 December 2010 - 1:13am

I was quite surprised by the content of this page, I wasn't aware of this at all !
All people deserve the same rights, and it doesn't matter if you're gay or straight or black or white. And i think if you believe in God, and you believe he is loving, then you should believe that he loves Gay people just as much as others, and wants them to be happy just as much as others.
John-Paul, from Sajoo

JohnG 31 January 2010 - 10:32pm / US

I am shocked by this. This new legislation by Uganda and the horrible treatment of Gay people in many African countries is a violation of basic human rights, and there's no way around it. All people deserve the same rights, and it doesn't matter if you're gay or straight or black or white. And i think if you believe in God, and you believe he is loving, then you should believe that he loves Gay people just as much as others, and wants them to be happy just as much as others. I think that the UN needs to take a more active role in condemning this kind of treatment and legislation around the world.

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