Radio Netherlands Worldwide

SSO Login

More login possibilities:

Close
  • Facebook
  • Flickr
  • Twitter
  • Google
  • LinkedIn
Home
Thursday 31 July  
Farming group at work in their community fields near the town of Masi Manimba
Map
Goma, Congo (Kinshasa)
Goma, Congo (Kinshasa)

Market gardening: a source of livelihood for DRC refugees

Published on : 22 February 2013 - 9:00am | By RNW Africa Desk (Photo: DFID/Flickr)
More about:

In the Congolese town of Masisu, Marceline Dusabe stands behind her market stall, which overflows with cabbages, carrots and onions. She, unlike many others displaced by the internal conflict in North Kivu, is not in need of food aid.

By Taylor Toeka Kakala, Goma, as originally published by IPS

Thanks to the money that Dusabe and her husband both earn from selling the produce they grow, they are even able to live in the privacy of their own home. Dusabe’s husband, Jules Birigimana, is particularly proud of this. “As soon as I was able to provide enough food for the family, I asked my hosts for permission to build my own hut on their land. I was able to do this from the money earned from my food garden,” Birigimana told IPS.

The couple is part of the UN’s estimated 910,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) across North Kivu – 150,000 of whom were displaced late last year during the heavy fighting between government forces and the rebel group M-23. While many still have limited access to basic food and services, some 30,000 IDPs in Masisu have been able to provide for themselves. 

Back at the Rubaya market, the stalls that surround Dusabe’s are also owned by refugees who have benefitted from the food security project in this town some 60 kilometres to the west of Goma. This is thanks to the Food Security Support Project, launched in July 2012 and run by the NGO Caritas International Belgium. 

How it works
Financed by the European Union, the project targets 5,500 IDP households (about 30,000 people) across eight small towns in the Masisu area. Each household is given access to about half a hectare of land to farm. The refugees grow basic vegetables, like Dusabe does, or they can choose to grow two sorts of staple foods, with a choice of beans, sorghum, maize and potatoes. In addition, each household is given ploughing implements, nutritional information and technical support.

The partnership between Caritas, traditional local authorities and landowners was crucial to brokering access to farmland for the refugees. Land, indeed, is hotly disputed here in northern DRC, with 80 percent of the local court cases relating to land ownership, according to the Justice and Peace Commission of the Catholic Diocese of Goma. The agreements brokered by Caritas are grounded in verbal sharecropping arrangements that allow refugees the use of parcels of land in return for part of the harvest.

The first harvest
The refugees’ first harvest was in November 2012. On average, each household produced 200 kilograms (kgs) of onions, 120 kgs of cabbage and 20 kgs of carrots.

“Since their first harvest, the participants in the project have not only increased overall food supplies, but more importantly have improved the quality and quantity of their own food intake,” George Mugabo, a nutritionist at the Rubaya health centre, told IPS.

Related content

According to a survey carried out by Caritas in December, this first harvest helped reduce the number of vulnerable people amongst the 5,550 households from 51 percent to 38 percent in five months.

“The survey forecast that by November 2013, the number of vulnerable people would be down to 25 percent,” Jean-Claude Mubenga, an agronomist at the food security project, told IPS.

The project has proved successful in part because the market vegetables can be harvested in a relatively short time. As conflict in the area has reduced the supply of produce, prices have also been more competitive.

“Buyers from Goma pay two dollars for 10 kgs of cabbage, five dollars for 10 kgs of carrots or onions, and 25 dollars for a 100-kg bag of potatoes,” Dusabe told IPS. She said that in Goma, the main market for Rubaya’s produce, the resale price is double.

With M23 rebels occupying Kibumba – a region 25 km north of Goma, which used to be the major market supplier – the harvests from Rubaya, for the time being, seem to be offsetting the fall in supplies.

“It is still a temporary situation,” as Goma resident Nafisa Fatuma pointed out to IPS. But Albert Ngendo, head of the local administration in Rubaya, has pleased with the project’s results so far. “The resettled families no longer have to worry about access to relief aid. This is the most important issue for me,” he told IPS.

Most popular news in this dossier

Katanga appears on a monitor in the ICC press room on 7 March 2014

What do Ituri residents say about the Katanga verdict?

Many young Ituri residents welcomed the International Criminal Court’s sentence against Congolese...
Mista Poa, a singer from North Kivu, DRC

My Song: A song for a new generation in the DRC

Mista Poa has seen a lot of pain and sorrow growing up in eastern Congo. Hailing from the heart of North Kivu...
Katanga is accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity

Eight things you need to know about the Katanga case at the ICC

This Friday, the International Criminal Court is due to deliver a verdict in its case against Congolese...
(Fully cartoon in body of article)

Want amnesty in the DRC? Get paper-pushing

A law on amnesty was recently put in place in the Demorcratic Republic of Congo. Its enactment means a...
DRC President Joseph Kabila in 2012

"Third term for DRC President Kabila will wreak social havoc"

Proposals to review the Democratic Republic of Congo’s constitution to permit President Joseph Kabila...

Discussion

Post new comment

Please be reminded all comments must be in English, short and to the point - guideline 250 words. Abusive and inappropriate comments will be removed.

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <p> <br>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.

More information about formatting options