Radio Netherlands Worldwide

SSO Login

More login possibilities:

Close
  • Facebook
  • Flickr
  • Twitter
  • Google
  • LinkedIn
Home
Thursday 23 October  
English Language Center (ELC) in Bujumbura
Map
Bujumbura, Burundi
Bujumbura, Burundi

Importance of English for Burundi's integration in the EAC

Published on : 21 January 2013 - 6:00am | By RNW Africa Desk (Photo: IWACU)
More about:

English teaching centers nowadays abound in Bujumbura. The Government of Burundi through the ministry in charge of the East African Community affairs is active in the promotion of this language.

By Nadine Nkengurutse Pierre Claver Nsengiyumva as published by partner IWACU

After closing or end of business hours, one can see how many Burundians are determined these days. Most of them go to take English lessons despite their fatigue. English is indeed a must for EAC integration! English learning training centres are currently many and the number of learners is increasing day after day. The English language training centres’ managers indeed acknowledge: "We get a lot of people who come to learn."

“Some of them are parliamentarians, officials, traders, tourists, etc.,” says Félicien Harerimana, responsible for English Language Center (ELC). He indicates that the centre’s clients come for two main reasons: "The first reason is linked to the entry of Burundi within EAC and Burundians have to use English in carrying out their socio-economic activities. The second reason is related to the problematic of employment because for most job opportunities, the fluency in English is a prerequisite.”

Related content

Though the centre requires each learner to pay nearly 75.000 Fbu per quarter, Mr. Harerimana considers this amount not high in these dire times when Burundians complain about the high cost of living. "Of course they have money to pay, but most importantly, they think about all the advantages they will gain after learning English."

Moreover, Harerimana is proud of recent winners’ performance who did not know a single word in English when they came to register: "We have taught English to traders who knew Kirundi and Swahili only when they came. Now, they are doing well in English.”

Read the full story here.

 

Most popular news in this dossier

In 2011, nine independent Ivorian newspapers were forced to shut after two month

World's media chiefs press African leaders on freedoms

Editors and publishers from across the world have singled out the governments of Egypt, Ethiopia, South...
An Internally Displaced Person (IDP) child cries as his mother tries to console

DRC: Hope for kids in Kinshasa

Despite horrific abuses perpetrated against women and children, the atrocities in the Democratic Republic of...
A scientist works in a laboratory at the International Livestock Research Instit

Africa: Four reasons skilled workers leave - and how to keep them

As African countries pursue policies designed to encourage economic growth, freer movement of talented people...
Vangelis Moras (seen left) of Greece and Emmanuel Emenike of Nigeria position fo

Nigeria need polish but improve steadily

In the third profile of Africa's World Cup contenders in Brazil, football analyst Nick Said looks at...
Manchester City star and African Footballer of the Year, Yaya Touré (seen left),

Ivory Coast fields powerful World Cup squad

In the first profile of Africa's World Cup contenders in Brazil, football analyst Nick Said looks at...

Discussion

euroice 4 March 2013 - 9:08am

Nice post and really thanks for sharing this valuable information us. 

Post new comment

Please be reminded all comments must be in English, short and to the point - guideline 250 words. Abusive and inappropriate comments will be removed.

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <p> <br>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.

More information about formatting options